D M A

Practice

We collaborate closely with our clients to develop a design solution that embodies their vision. Our holistic approach engages both digital technology along with traditional drawing and modelling techniques to effectively resolve a built project.

Our approach to design

DMA believe architecture is a ‘generalist’ profession which engages with all components of an architectural project; during conceptual design, documentation and construction phases. We pride ourselves on being able to holistically engage with a complex of architectural issues to arrive at a design solution equally appropriate to its context (site and surrounds) and the unique ways our clients prefer to live.

Context

Whether or not an urban, coastal or countryside setting – the topography of a site, and the characteristics and subtleties of its surrounding context form key drivers in the resolution of architectural space and form. New Zealander’s value a strong connection with their environment and DMA projects strongly reflect this ideal. Environmental sustainability and intelligent use of local resources is becoming an increasingly important consideration that we encourage our clients to embrace.

Living

Every client has specific requirements and preferences, but we believe there is a certain commonality in the way New Zealanders tend to live. This is reflected in the arrangement of open, private, indoor and outdoor spaces. The fundamental nature of domestic architecture is to provide shelter and refuge, however the approach to this is unique to each client. DMA works closely with clients to discuss their aspirations, work though a design and surpass their expectations.

Sculptural Resolve

Architecture is three dimensional. DMA responds to context and living through the organisation of space, sculpting of form and the materiality of that form. We engage in a rigorous, three dimensional design process utilising all of the traditional and technological tools at our disposal.

The architectural process

Initial Discussion / Contract Agreement – An initial no-obligation discussion allows us to understand the aspirations for your project. We are able to take you through our general design philosophies and illustrate how these have been applied to our previous projects.

Pre-Design – We can make a valuable contribution to your project before the design conception by helping to prepare a comprehensive brief and advising on project feasibility, including a preliminary analysis of the site and the relevant development controls. An Agreement for Architectural Services between Client and Architect is worked through together.

Concept Design – This stage involves deciphering opportunities and constraints within the proposed site or existing building, to develop architectural solutions at a conceptual level. The Client brief is given form and basic functionality with a combination of drawings investigating the space and site, as well as three dimensional concept images.

Preliminary Design - Resource Consent – The preferred concept is refined. The preliminary design is described using scaled plans and elevations. At this stage we recommend that a Quantity Surveyor is engaged to provide a Preliminary Estimate of Costs based on the drawings. Once an estimate of costs has been obtained, a Resource Consent (if required at this stage) may be applied for.

Developed Design – This stage involves a further refinement of the design. Final decisions are made so that all parties completely understand and are at ease with the design before starting the detailed documentation. At the conclusion of Developed Design, the building is sufficiently defined to give a clear understanding of the scope of work, costs and the architectural look and feel.

Detailed Design and Documentation - Building Consent – The Developed Design is further refined to produce detailed drawings and specifications that will allow a building consent to be applied for.

Detailed Design and Documentation - Construction – Once the building consent has been approved, we complete the documentation required for the construction of the house. We provide additional schedules, such as the window and door schedule, and details that would be required for construction that were not required for building consent.

Detailed Design and Documentation - Componentry and Interiors – This stage includes the material selections for inside the house, as well as providing drawings and schedules for the interior cabinetry, kitchens and bathrooms, and lighting electrical plans.

Detailed Design and Documentation - Landscaping and Exteriors – An additional service we provide is the design, detailing and documentation of the exterior hard landscaping elements. This includes pools, decks, fences, gates and outdoor living areas. This does not include planting plans which require the input of a separate consultant.

Contractor Procurement – Methods of building procurement suited to the project are discussed as the design develops. Typically projects are tendered to selected contractors in order to gain a competitive fixed price. Other methods are available depending upon preferred timeframe, budget, desired quality and current economic climate.

Contract Administration and Observation – The project is constructed to a stage of Practical Completion that allows the Client to occupy the facility, under a contract between the Client and the Contractor. Most standard building contracts include provisions for the contract to be administered by an architect. Some contracts allow for administration by the owner or an independent agent.

Fees – It is important that clients are made aware of the costs of architectural services early in the relationship. We are happy to talk about fees and services and will give quotes once the scope of work is known. Our charges will be specific to the complexity of the job. Fees can be based upon time charges, lump-sum fees, percentage fees or a combination of these. We use a standard NZIA Agreement for Architectural Services as a contract between client and architect.

Awards + Publications

  • 2011

    Resene Total Colour Award, Best Residential Interior

    Corinth
  • 2011

    NZIAAuckland Branch Award

    Korora
  • 2011

    NZIAAuckland Branch Award

    9 Elmstone
  • 2011

    HOME of the Year Finalist

    9 Elmstone
  • 2011

    CCANZConcrete³ Sustainability Award, Excellence in Residential Concrete Construction

    9 Elmstone
  • 2010

    International Property AwardsBest Architecture, Residential (Single Unit)

    Church Bay
  • 2010

    HOME of the Year Finalist

    Korora
  • 2010

    HOME of the Year Finalist

    Waikopua
  • 2008

    NZIAAuckland Branch Award, Residential

    Clifton
  • 2007

    NZIANational Award

    Corinth
  • 2007

    NZIAAuckland Branch Award, Residential

    Taumata
  • 2007

    NZIAAuckland Branch Award

    1 Belmont
  • 2006

    NZIAAuckland Branch Award

    Corinth
  • 2006

    NZIAAuckland Branch Award

    Pupuke
  • 2005

    NZIAAuckland Branch Award

    Church Bay
  • 2003

    H&EShortlisted for House of the Year

    Fitzpatrick
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  • 2013

    New Suburban: Reinventing the Family Home in Australia and New Zealand Thames & Hudson, Australia, pg. 104-111

    9 Elmstone
  • 2013

    Haus & AutoCallwey, Germany, pg. 156-161

    Lucerne
  • 2013

    OBJECTNo. 23, Jun/Jul, Men's Interior, pg. 60-63

    Lucerne
  • 2011

    Summer HousesPenguin Group, New Zealand, pg. 166-173

    Waikopua
  • 2011

    Life Element《生活元素》Nov, 'Korora Project 克罗拉 别墅', pg. 32-40

    Korora
  • 2011

    ARQ DesignJuly/Aug, 'Korora House, Nova Zelandia', pg. 38-43

    Korora
  • 2010

    HOME New ZealandAug/Sep, 'Solid State', pg. 102-112

    9 Elmstone
  • 2010

    A Place in the Sun: Innovative Homes Design For Our Climate, Australia and New ZealandThames & Hudson, Australia, pg. 150-155

    Korora
  • 2010

    HOME New Zealand Aug/Sep, 'On a Clear Day', pg. 112-120

    Korora
  • 2010

    HOME New Zealand Aug/Sep, 'Down in a Quiet Bay', pg. 78-86

    Waikopua
  • 2009

    HOME New Zealand 'Essential Villa-ness', pg. 60-63

    Clifton
  • 2009

    Habitus Issue 03: 'Colour & Light: A House Re-crafted', cover page; 'A Pause in Time', pg. 99-108

    Corinth
  • 2009

    MôjdomMarch, pg. 71

    1 Belmont
  • 2007

    Urbis Issue 38, pg. 128-135

    Cimino
  • 2007

    HOME New Zealand Oct/Nov, pg. 127-131

    Cimino
  • 2007

    New Zealand Architecture | 2007pg. 33-37

    1 Belmont
  • 2007

    New Zealand Architecture | 2007pg. 33-37

    Taumata
  • 2007

    New Zealand Architecture | 2007pg. 33-37

    Urban House
  • 2007

    Metro Home & EntertainingCover page, June/July, pg. 64-72

    1 Belmont
  • 2007

    Architecture New Zealand Issue 3, pg. 69

    Corinth
  • 2007

    Architecture New Zealand Issue 2, pg. 28-29

    Pupuke
  • 2007

    Architecture New Zealand Issue 2, pg. 28-29

    Corinth
  • 2007

    Interior Digest (Russia)No. 2, pg. 150-159

    Fitzpatrick
  • 2007

    Houses NZ Kitchens & BathroomsIssue 1, pg. 50-56

    Kakariki
  • 2006

    Urbis Issue 35, pg. 134-137

    Pupuke
  • 2006

    Urbis Issue 34, pg. 132

    Corinth
  • 2006

    UrbisIssue 31, pg. 132

    Urban House
  • 2006

    Inside Out March/April, pg. 86-93

    Fitzpatrick
  • 2006

    Architecture New Zealand March/April, pg. 33

    Church Bay
  • 2005

    Architectural Digest (France)June, pg. 95-101

    Fitzpatrick
  • 2005

    Metro Home & Entertaining April/May, pg. 86-92

    Church Bay
  • 2004

    Progressive BuildingFeb/March, pg. 39

    Church Bay
  • 2003

    Metro Home & Entertaining Cover page, Oct/Nov, pg. 76-83

    Fitzpatrick
  • 2001

    Glass House: Buildings for Open LivingThames and Hudson, UK

    Fitzpatrick
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Contact

Level 1
472 Karangahape Rd
P.O. Box 68302
Newton
Auckland 1145
New Zealand
  • tel: +64 09 354 3587
  • fax: +64 09 354 3284
NZIA Practice
NZ Registered Architect