People

The team at DMA consists of a group of highly skilled people with a diverse range of complimentary skills. From our Auckland office, our dynamic team collaborates closely with local and international clients to realise their aspirations, working through a design that aims to surpass their expectations.

Daniel marshall

Daniel Marshall

Director

BArch [hons], University of Auckland 1993
Registered Architect
Associate of the New Zealand Institute of Architects

Shiqi shelley lin

Shiqi Shelley Lin

Senior Associate

BAS, MArch(Prof) [hons], University of Auckland
Registered Architect

Chelsie Johnston

Chelsie Johnston

BAS, Victoria University of Wellington
MArch(Prof) [hons], University of Auckland

Jackson Mills

Jackson Mills

BAS, Christchurch Polytech Institute of Technology

Mercè Cofan Esteba

Mercè Cofan Esteba

BAS, University of Girona,
M Arch, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya

Timothy Yang

Timothy Yang

BAS, MArch(Prof) [hons], University of Auckland
Registered Architect

Gail Batten

Gail Batten

Office Administration

Seamus

Seamus

Security Warden Grief Councillor

Layke

Layke

Entertainment Officer

Our Approach

The studio's approach is grounded on the interconnected relationship between context and the human lived experience to formulate a sculptural resolve.

The team at DMA exhibits a highly developed sense of craft, informed by a vast set of cross sector influences in art and sculpture, industrial design, technological innovation and culture. The process employs both traditional and cutting edge technological tools & strategies to achieve our clients wishes.

The studio has an impressive portfolio, showcasing a wide range of projects, including celebrated residential, commercial and interior works. DMA has won numerous architectural awards with work being regularly published in New Zealand and further abroad.

Context

Context

Whether urban, coastal or countryside setting; each site's topography, characteristics and subtitles of its surrounds form key drivers for the resolution of architectural space and form. The New Zealand ethos is harmonious with the natural environment.

With consideration to sustainable, adaptable design and intelligent use of local resources, the team at DMA produces context sensitive architecture that encapsulates this 'Kiwi' ideal. 

Live experience

Lived Experience

The quintessential 'Kiwi' lived experience has a series of shared principles that are reflected through the arrangement of open, private, indoor and outdoor spaces. However, in addition to these commonalities, each person's lived experience is unique.

The fundamental nature of domestic architecture is to provide shelter and refuge and at DMA we work closely with clients to define their individual requirements. 

Sculpture resolve 1
Sculpture resolve 2

Sculptural Resolve

Architecture is three dimensional. The team at DMA provides considered and engaging designs that respond to context in correlation with the human experience. We experiment with the organisation of space, manipulation of form and careful material selection to achieve a sculptural resolution that acknowledges genius loci and each client’s individual sensibility. 

Architectural Process

The studio's approach is grounded on the interconnected relationship between context and the human lived experience to formulate a sculptural resolve.

  1. In this initial no-obligation discussion, DMA will meet with you to discuss your aspirations regarding your project. We will also communicate DMA’s general design philosophies and explain how this methodology has been applied to our previous projects.

  2. At this stage DMA will help to prepare a comprehensive brief for the project and advise on project feasibility. We will also provide a preliminary analysis of the site and gather relevant property data. An Agreement for Architectural Services is also determined between client and Architect at this stage.

  3. This stage involves deciphering opportunities and constraints within the proposed site or existing building, to develop Architectural solutions at a conceptual level. The brief is given form and functionality through a combination of drawings investigating the space and site, as well as three dimensional imagery.

  4. Once the concept design has been considered and approved by the client, DMA works to further refine the design. The design is worked into a set of scaled drawings, including plans and elevations. It is recommended that a Quantity Surveyor is engaged to review the preliminary design drawing set and prepare a preliminary estimate cost. Once this cost has been identified, the drawings and documentation can be prepared for a Resource Consent submission (if required).

  5. With consideration of client feedback, further refinement of the design evolves. At this stage, it is important that final decisions regarding the design are made and that all involved approve and understand the proposal. The scope of work, cost and architectural look and feel of the project should be clear at the end of this stage. This confirmation enables DMA to continue to the next stage which is detailed design.

  6. 06a. Building Consent

    DMA will collaborate with other consultants that might be required at this stage to produce the relevant documentation, including specification and a coordinated set of drawings in preparation for building consent submission.

    06b. Component & Interiors

    As part of the detailed design stage, DMA can also be engaged to make material selections for the project’s interiors, as well as provide 2D and 3D design and documentation for interior cabinetry, including kitchens and bathrooms. We also work closely with separate consultants to produce electrical lighting plans.

    06c. Landscaping & Exteriors

    Additionally, DMA is also able to offer the design, detailing & documentation services associated with exterior hard landscaping elements. This includes pools, decks, fences, gates and outdoor and outdoor living areas. This does not include planting areas which requires the engagement of a separate consultant.

  7. DMA will discuss methods of building procurement with the client at this stage of the project. Different methods are suited to different projects / clients, however projects are typically tendered to selected contractors in order to gain a competitive fixed price. Other methods are available depending on preferred time frame, budget, desired quality and current economic climate.

  8. The project is constructed to a stage of Practical Completion. This is the point in which the client is able to occupy the building under a contract agreed on between the client and contractor. Most building contracts include provisions for the contract to be administered by an Architect. This means that the Architect is engaged in general administration services, as well as additional services such as assessing payment claims, extension of time claims, working through the defects liability certificate and officially issuing the practical completion.

    Alternatively, some contracts allow for the owner or an independent agent to administer the project.

  9. DMA can also provide services of project observation. This means that the Architect is engaged to carry out site visits and ensure that the build is in accordance with the construction documents and specification. If the Architect is not engaged in this service, they will not visit the site during the construction period.

  10. It is important that clients are made aware of the costs of Architectural services early on in the relationship. DMA is able to provide a quote, outlining fees and services once the scope of work is known. Charges are specific to the complexity of each job and are calculated upon time based charges, lump sum fees, percentage fees or a combination of the previously outlined. The NZIA Agreement for Architectural Services is the contract we use between Client and Architect.

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Awards

2022
NZIA Auckland Architecture Award, Housing
2020
Trends International Design Awards Highly Commended TIDA New Zealand Architect-Design Bathroom
2020
Trends International Design Awards Winner of TIDA New Zealand Architect-Design Bathroom Suite
2019
Resene Total Colour Award, Best Residential Exterior
2019
NZIA Auckland Award for Alterations & Addition
2011
Resene Total Colour Award, Best Residential Interior
2011
NZIA Auckland Branch Award
2011
NZIA Auckland Branch Award
2011
HOME of the Year Finalist
2011
CCANZ Concrete³ Sustainability Award, Excellence in Residential Concrete Construction
2010
NZIA Resene Colour Award
2010
NZIA Waikato Bay of Plenty Branch Award, Residential
2010
International Property Awards Best Architecture, Residential (Single Unit)
2010
HOME of the Year Finalist
2010
HOME of the Year Finalist
2008
NZIA Auckland Branch Award, Residential
2007
NZIA National Award
2007
NZIA Auckland Branch Award, Residential
2007
NZIA Auckland Branch Award
2006
NZIA Auckland Branch Award
2006
NZIA Auckland Branch Award
2005
NZIA Auckland Branch Award
2003
H&E Shortlisted for House of the Year

Publications

2022
Artravel no.103
2022
BlackWhite Issue 05
2019
HOME New Zealand Mar 2019, HOME New Zealand, pg. Cover, 80-92
2019
HOME New Zealand Oct/Nov 2019, HOME New Zealand, pg. 118-130
2018
HOUSES HOUSES NZ - winter 2018, issue 48, Architects in Profile pg. 38-49
2015
Celebrity Designers: 50 Interview on Design, Architecture, and Life E-book, Author : Maria Spassov
2013
New Suburban: Reinventing the Family Home in Australia and New Zealand Thames & Hudson, Australia, pg. 104-111
2013
Haus & Auto Callwey, Germany, pg. 156-161
2013
OBJECT No. 23, Jun/Jul, Men's Interior, pg. 60-63
2011
Summer Houses Penguin Group, New Zealand, pg. 166-173
2011
Life Element《生活元素》 Nov, 'Korora Project 克罗拉 别墅', pg. 32-40
2011
ARQ Design July/Aug, 'Korora House, Nova Zelandia', pg. 38-43
2010
HOME New Zealand Aug/Sep, 'Solid State', pg. 102-112
2010
A Place in the Sun: Innovative Homes Design For Our Climate, Australia and New Zealand Thames & Hudson, Australia, pg. 150-155
2010
HOME New Zealand Aug/Sep, 'On a Clear Day', pg. 112-120
2010
HOME New Zealand Aug/Sep, 'Down in a Quiet Bay', pg. 78-86
2009
HOME New Zealand 'Essential Villa-ness', pg. 60-63
2009
Habitus Issue 03: 'Colour & Light: A House Re-crafted', cover page; 'A Pause in Time', pg. 99-108
2009
Môjdom March, pg. 71
2007
Urbis Issue 38, pg. 128-135
2007
HOME New Zealand Oct/Nov, pg. 127-131
2007
New Zealand Architecture | 2007 pg. 33-37
2007
New Zealand Architecture | 2007 pg. 33-37
2007
New Zealand Architecture | 2007 pg. 33-37
2007
Metro Home & Entertaining Cover page, June/July, pg. 64-72
2007
Architecture New Zealand Issue 3, pg. 69
2007
Architecture New Zealand Issue 2, pg. 28-29
2007
Architecture New Zealand Issue 2, pg. 28-29
2007
Interior Digest (Russia) No. 2, pg. 150-159
2007
Houses NZ Kitchens & Bathrooms Issue 1, pg. 50-56
2006
Urbis Issue 35, pg. 134-137
2006
Urbis Issue 34, pg. 132
2006
Urbis Issue 31, pg. 132
2006
Inside Out March/April, pg. 86-93
2006
Architecture New Zealand March/April, pg. 33
2005
Architectural Digest (France) June, pg. 95-101
2005
Metro Home & Entertaining April/May, pg. 86-92
2004
Progressive Building Feb/March, pg. 39
2003
Metro Home & Entertaining Cover page, Oct/Nov, pg. 76-83
2001
Glass House: Buildings for Open Living Thames and Hudson, UK